Boolean Chair
       
     
BooleanChair_front_w.jpg
       
     
Boolean Chair
       
     
Boolean Chair

Boolean, named after mathematician George Boole and first used in 1851 to describe a logical combinatorial system that uses true or false (1 or 0) values to determine an answer to a problem. The most common forms used are AND, OR, and NOT. In CAD, Boolean focuses on the intersection and overlaps of models. OR, AND, NOT in CAD can be thought of as Union, Intersect, Subtract. Each of these will create a different result if applied to two or more shapes occupying the same space. With the Boolean Chair, rounded rectangles are both unioned and subtracted from the box shape, together forming an angled seat. A rounded triangle is unioned with the box to create a bulbousy seat back. Booleans are a continuation of Stuart's exploration into CAD as a tool for artistic expression. In this case, Stuart is interested in using the software tool to highlight the two primary methods for creating sculpture; additive and subtractive in a child-like, visually direct way.

This was part of the group show, The Chair, April/May 2019 at The Future Perfect NYC

BooleanChair_front_w.jpg